That Work Life.

I’m pleased to say that my new workplace, Kasha, has been keeping me busy these past few weeks. I’m finally over the hump of not having any work to do and despite not being paid (yet!), I love the opportunity of working directly with a women’s health company operating in Rwanda.

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Ultimate Frisbee Tournament in Uganda

Last weekend, we traveled with the local frisbee team to a tournament in Entebbe, Uganda! We got to play against teams from Kenya and Uganda and cheer on a showcase game between top players from both countries. The weekend started at the Kigali bus station in Nyabugogo (pronounced “nobbue-go-go”) where we met up with the team Thursday night to catch our overnight bus to Kampala, Uganda. The 8-hour trip costs only $15, but it’s hot, you won’t get any rest as the roads are extremely bumpy and, about halfway through the trip, you have to get off the bus to cross the border. Crossing between Rwanda and Uganda on bus is an adventure of its own and involves walking around 1,000 feet down a dark dirt road from Rwandan immigration, where you received an exit stamp, to the Ugandan immigration, where they issue an entry visa, because, for whatever reason, you aren’t allowed to cross the border on the bus.

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Marriage, at last!

September 9th marked the final ceremony of Ariane and Ben’s wedding.  No other part of the marriage process began on time so we figured we could be a few minutes late to the religious ceremony.  Alas, the church service began right on time and we rolled into the Catholic church 15 minutes late (thankfully with a lot of other late folks so it didn’t look as bad).  Ariane and Ben were seated at the front of the church with two other couples and each couples’ maid of honor and best man.  The attire this time was the big white wedding dress (and I mean, BIG—Ariane’s dress weighed 5kg apparently!) and full suits.

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Housing, Getting Around, + Loving Humans.

We’ve been settling into our apartment and trying to figure out how housing and utilities work here.  Because I used to work in refugee resettlement, I can’t help but compare our experiences in navigating new systems and can empathize with some of my clients’ woes!  Of course, Colin and I aren’t refugees—we’re not fleeing for our lives, we had the choice to move here and can always move back, we have amazing support systems both in the US and here—but we’re experiencing some of the same struggles of trying to grasp how rent, electricity, water, etc. work here. 

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A Very Civil Wedding.

On Thursday, I attended Ariane’s civil wedding, part 4 of the wedding events.  It was held at a civil service government building in a large room with rows of benches and a front stage.  Ariane and Ben were one couple of about 7 or 8 other couples getting legally married that day and they all sat in the front row facing the stage.  Everyone was dressed to the nines, the men in suits and the women wearing either floor length white dresses or fancy knee-length dresses.  The benches behind the couples were filled with family members and close friends of the couples.

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